Volume 7, Issue 3, May 2018, Page: 67-74
HIV Related Admission and Associated Factors among Adult Patients Admitted to Medical Ward at Adama Hospital Medical College, Adama, Oromia, Ethiopia
Dagim Assefa Kassaye, Department of Internal Medicine, Adama Hospital Medical College, Adama, Ethiopia
Haji Aman Deybasso, Department of Public Health, Adama Hospital Medical College, Adama, Ethiopia
Godana Jarso Guto, Department of Internal Medicine, Adama Hospital Medical College, Adama, Ethiopia
Worku Dugassa Girsha, Department of Public Health, Adama Hospital Medical College, Adama, Ethiopia
Received: Jan. 2, 2018;       Accepted: May 30, 2018;       Published: Jun. 25, 2018
DOI: 10.11648/j.cmr.20180703.13      View  921      Downloads  64
Abstract
Reports are indicating increased rate of HIV related admissions despite high coverage of anti-retroviral drug usage. The aim of this study was to assess the magnitude of HIV related admission and associated factors among adult patients admitted to Medical ward of Adama Hospital Medical College in Ethiopia. An institution based cross sectional study design was conducted by using the formula to estimate a single population proportion (P) of 65% taken from HIV case hospital bed occupancy in Addis Ababa hospitals to select a total of 549 patients. Data were collected by an interviewer administered pre tested structured questionnaires. The 95% confidence intervals with p-value of less than 0.05 were considered statistically significant. Analysis was performed by using Statistical package for the social sciences (SPSS v 21) software program. A total of 538(97.9%) patients were involved in a study out of which, 120(22.3%) of them were HIV cases with various clinical manifestations. Toxoplasmosis was the commonest 32(26.7%) opportunistic infection. Patients who had divorced, widowed or separated were 2.6 (AOR 2.6, CI: 1.16, 6.00), Smear positive pulmonary tuberculosis were 4.6 times (AOR 4.6, CI, 1.52, 14.35), Bacterial pneumonia case were 37 times (AOR 37, CI:14.36, 99.68), those with disseminated tuberculosis were 56 times (AOR 56, CI=17.34, 85.84) and patients with neurological illnesses were 27 times (AOR 27, CI=14:00, 55.19) more likely to be admitted. Whereas, patients with age category of 45 to 54 years were less likely to be admitted to hospital by over 80% (AOR 0.18, CI: 0.06, 0.57) compared to age category of 15 to 24 years old. The prevalence of HIV related admission was lower compared to other studies. Age of the patients, respiratory system infections, Neurological infections and marital status of the patients were found to have significant association with HIV related admission.
Keywords
Adult, HIV Admission, Medical Ward, Adama, Ethiopia
To cite this article
Dagim Assefa Kassaye, Haji Aman Deybasso, Godana Jarso Guto, Worku Dugassa Girsha, HIV Related Admission and Associated Factors among Adult Patients Admitted to Medical Ward at Adama Hospital Medical College, Adama, Oromia, Ethiopia, Clinical Medicine Research. Vol. 7, No. 3, 2018, pp. 67-74. doi: 10.11648/j.cmr.20180703.13
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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